Cadboro Bay Walk and Talk Series

From November 2010 until May 1, 2011 CBRA conducted a series of alternate Sunday afternoon Walk and Talk sessions concerning issues of importance to this community. Each began at 1:30 pm at a designated meeting place and lasted for an hour and a half. When it rained, we bought coffee and held our discussions indoors. The results of each event are described on this web page so the whole community can share and consider the information.

Until now, all such events have been guided and recorded by Norman Mogensen, who will no longer be on the CBRA Board of Directors because he will probably have to move away from this community to live in a condo or other 'no-step' accommodation which is not available in this community at present.

These Walk & Talk events have proven to be a very helpful forum for exploring community issues and it would be a loss to simply abandon them. Would you be interested in assuming this role? If so, please contact the chairperson of the 21st Century Vision and Planning Committee, Elizabeth Borek. Be prepared to explain/demonstrate why you are a suitable candidate.

Table of Contents


Climate Change by Dr Francis Zwiers

Summary of Dr Francis Zwiers Talk to the Community of Cadboro Bay on January 20, 2011

Transcription by Norman Mogensen, approved by Dr. Zwiers

Dr. Francis Zwiers is the Director of the Pacific Climate Impacts Consortium and was previously the Director of the Climate Research Division at Environment Canada, following 22 years of climate research. He shares a Nobel Prize for his work on climate change.

Dr. Zwiers stated that there have always been natural causes of climate fluctuation and these are reasonably well understood by climate scientists. Scientists have demonstrated that in addition, there are now human causes of climate change that are real, operate on a large scale and are having real effects on our climate. Since the beginning of the Industrial Revolution, and its accompanying Technological Revolution, concentrations of greenhouse gasses in the atmosphere have increased very rapidly due to human induced greenhouse gas emissions. As yet there is no evidence of that subsiding. Indeed it is still growing. The UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, in its 2007 report concluded that "Most of the observable increase in global average temperatures since the mid-20th century is very likely due to the observed increase in anthropogenic greenhouse gas concentrations."

There are now enough greenhouse gases circulating in the atmosphere that if all such gas releases were immediately and fully stopped, the globe would continue to warm slowly for several hundred years, and sea level would continue to rise for millennia with the result that the world's climate would be permanently changed. We have not stopped any of this, so expect worse. An important part of the impact of this is rising deep ocean temperatures, which together with the partial melting of glaciers and ice caps, lead to higher sea levels.

There will be many costly impacts of this, including:

. Dr. Zwiers did not address the specific human causes of greenhouse gases here, but Saanich's Climate Action Plan (page 7) estimated that this municipality generated 521,000 tonnes of greenhouse gasses in 2007 and this will rise to over 577,000 tonnes by 2020 if no effective action is taken. Of that, 62% is from vehicle emissions; 30% is from buildings (mainly archaic heating sources and building leaks), and 8% from waste disposal. This amount averages approximately 4.7 tonnes of locally produced greenhouse gasses per individual resident of Saanich. Of course each of us is responsible for much more than that, which is generated in the production, storage and transportation of all the energy, goods and foodstuffs we consume, that originate elsewhere. Add to that such things as greenhouse gasses generated in our name by airline operations, our military, our governments, fishing fleets, etc. Perhaps it is time to seriously re-examine assumptions about benevolence of "the economy" which has attained a status of holy gravitas, without serious challenge.


Food Security by Dr Aleck Ostry

Summary of Dr Aleck Ostry's Talk to the Community of Cadboro Bay on January 20, 2011

Transcription by Norman Mogensen, approved by Dr. Ostry

Dr. Aleck Ostry is Canada Research Chair for the Social Determinants of Community Health, and he is Associate Professor, Department of Geography, University of Victoria. He addressed residents of Cadboro Bay on the subject of "food security" at a public meeting on January 20, 2011

Dr. Ostry described our societys shift away from consumption of locally grown fruits and vegetables and increasingly toward foods (largely imported) that are less healthy for us. BC residents' food consumption habits, on average, do not provide the standard of nutrition to keep us all well, hence the recent rise in obesity, diabetes, etc. The poor are most affected. BC's agricultural output has shifted strongly toward animal products, greenhouse vegetables and wine, largely for export. Meanwhile we import most of our fruits and vegetables from huge industrial farms, great distances away, and are ncreasingly vulnerable to vagaries of climate change, regardless of the cost in greenhouse gas emissions from getting the stuff to us. We were at one time 97% self sufficient in food-stuffs.

Dr. Ostry noted the higher cost of meat based diets, in terms of the much larger acreages needed to feed the animals that inefficiently convert their food into meat, poultry and eggs for us. These operations are generally large (requiring mechanization), located a long way from consumers, and thus entailing more storage and shipping, all of which are costly in greenhouse gasses. He noted that as poor countries grow rich, they want richer diets, with all that entails. He suggested this, plus the increased use of arable land for ethanol production, is leading to a stretched food system that is leading to higher prices and eventually food shortages that will be more intensively expressed in high prices. Serious food shortages lead to social unrest, the spread of disease and ultimately, to famine and system failure.

Dr. Ostry stresses the many important benefits of eating locally grown food and eating seasonally available local food, rather than trying to live as though it is perpetually summer here. This raised the question of where a community like ours could grow enough food locally, to feed ourselves a full and balanced diet. It was suggested our capacity could, at best, only support vegan diets which we, as natural omnivores, might rebel at. What is the answer? We must find answers quickly.


Geological Considerations Respecting Our Community's Development

Summary of Walk & Talk held on November 7, 2010

Notes compiled by Norman Mogensen

Based on information supplied by the Geological Survey of Canada and using a topographical map supplied by Saanich, interested community members walked to key points on the 5 meter above sea level perimeter line in the Cadboro Bay Village area. The purpose was to provide information and a clear notion of what 5 meters of additional water would flood in our community and consider some earthquake factors. During the last 3500 years there have been 7 major (level 8 to 9) earthquakes, at irregular intervals, that might have affected Cadboro Bay. There have also been a larger number of weaker ones. The last major quake happened in 1700 AD. Scientists calculate that in the next 100 years there is a 37% chance of a damaging earthquake in this region.

Five meters was chosen because we were advised that a tsunami from a major earthquake at the outer edge of the continental shelf edge (the subduction zone) might cause maximum waves of 3 meters high at Cadboro Bay, depending on exactly where the quake's epi-centre occurs along the 1300 km. long subduction zone. Continuous tsunami waves might extend over a period of several hours. Scientists also predict a sea level rise of one meter from polar ice melt during the remainder of this century, and more beyond that. If during a tsunami, there is a high tide and a strong onshore wind, sea water would be pushed even further inland, so a total of 5 meters was chosen for this examination.

A local area map was temporarily posted on CBRA's Village bulletin board, so you could examine the boundaries of the 5 meter line throughout the whole community.

Most of the 5 meter Gyro/Village zone is underlain with peat and/or sand, and is thus subject to liquefaction if that material is waterlogged during a large earthquake. During a state of liquefaction, heavy objects tend to partly sink into the sand slurry and may break-up. Peat and sand under-lays tend to amplify the degree of shaking caused by large earthquakes, making them extra hazardous areas for people and structures.

Conversations during the walk tended to emphasize that more caution will be needed in future, about what is built and how it is built in this hazard zone. Modern science about earthquakes and tsunamis has largely developed since the 1960s and widespread public awareness only emerged more recently, so this subject was largely ignored in earlier Local Area Plans for our area.

The geological history of the western half of our community has resulted in varying depths of sand under-laying much of it, so testing for liquefaction potential probably should become standard procedure, especially for large new structures there. This does not apply to areas with exposed or shallow bedrock, such as is commonly found on Ten Mile Point.


Potential New Walking Options Examined

Summary of Walk & Talk held on November 21, 2010

Notes compiled by Norman Mogensen

Assuming a need to reduce our greenhouse gas emissions and to improve our ability to move easily between vital parts of this community, this walk & talk considered sites involving the following ideas.

  1. There was once a lost opportunity for a recreational circuit route, when site planning took place respecting the zone between the southwest end of Waring Place and Hibbens Close. This might have made a great return trip path alternative after walking to the south end of the beach. Maybe sometime in the distant future.
  2. A connector to the Village could be considered, from the Maynard Park area and points north and west of there. It could extend between Penrhyn (at the village) and Kilgary, where there is now no existing right of way from the east end of Maynard Park.
  3. Now the public uses the walking lane connecting Hobbs Street to Frank Hobbs School, and then crosses the open school yard, directly to Haro Road. Consider the possibility of a more child secure enclosed perimeter walking lane for the public, along the east boundary of the school yard. It could proceed south from the existing Hobbs Lane, to the southeast corner of the school yard, then west along the south boundary of the school yard, to Haro Road. From there walkers could either go directly up Haro Road to UVic or approach it along Camelot. Both options offer shorter lengths of steepness and are pleasanter alternatives to Sinclair Hill.
  4. A second enclosed and more child secure walking lane could proceed north from Hobbs Lane, along the east boundary of Frank Hobbs School yard, to and through its boundary fence with Goward House lands, where it could split. One option there would be to walk directly to Haro Road between the school and kindergarten enclosures, and from there access the Haro Woods trail network. A second option could be to connect to those parts of the Goward Estate trail network, permitted by the society that manages that property for Saanich. It could also connect with Haro Road and from there, a different part of the Haro Woods trail network.
  5. The Goward trail network can easily connect to any trail network ultimately permitted by UVic on the Queenswood estate. An existing trail in Queenswood extends out onto Queenswood Road, at a point aligned with an existing trail connecting it to Annabern Cres. and MacDonald. The existing trail in Queenswood extends near and could easily link to Haro Road, north of Arbutus and to the Arbutus Road access points to Goward lands, to its south.
These are only options than can be considered, commented upon and amended by Cadboro Bay residents, before they are communicated to Saanich.

One further walking route options 'walk & talk' will be held on Sunday, February 27, 2011, when an upper Greenvale connector to McColl, a new linear trail from west Phyllis Park to the main body of that park, and a Lockhaven connector to that park will be considered, along with more new walking route options in other places in this community. Please supply any other similar ideas you may have to nmogensen@shaw.ca.


Cadboro Bay Village Centre Boundary

Summary of Walk & Talk held on January 9, 2011

Notes compiled by Norman Mogensen

Cadboro Bay's village centre boundary, as it is depicted on Map 10.1 of our 2002 Local Area Plan, is in serious conflict with the findings reported for our walk & talk on November 7, 2010, that is separately described under the heading "Geological Considerations Respecting Our Community's Development".

On January 9, 2011 a group of residents walked about the village centre's hinterland to identify the most important exclusions and new inclusions to the Village Centre of the future. Here are some suggestions people made:

About half of the current village centre zone is unacceptably vulnerable to tsunamis and heightened risks from earthquakes, so its boundary needs to be adjusted. Boundary adjustment should militate against further high density developments in the tsunami zone, however any village boundary changes should not prompt early abandonment of what already exists in that zone. When large structures there need replacement, they should be relocated to higher ground and caution is advised about further developments in the tsunami zone.

The following tentative suggestions were offered for consideration as the new village boundary.

More careful consideration is needed by more people of our community, before any final plan is adopted.


Options for Enhancing Local Food Security

Summary of Walk & Talk held on January 23, 2011

Notes compiled by Norman Mogensen

A world food supply crisis is developing, that will first become manifest through sharply rising prices and then in some places, as food shortages. This has already been described as one of the causes of social unrest in Egypt and may have huge consequences elsewhere too. It has long been anticipated by strategic investors, who have been quietly buying up farmland, fishing rights and conglomerating food manufacturing establishments so than already before shortages gets fully established, ownership has become highly concentrated, mostly in few private hands that will profit greatly by it. Try investing in your favorite brands. You will find few that are still publicly traded.

Food shortages are being caused by the confluence of several factors, some of which are:

Our region will not be immune from these effects, yet there is no apparent plan to enable us to grow enough of the right kinds of food to meet the needs of our population. Citizens and communities now need to make their own plans to fill this vacuum.

This community walk and talk focused on what we could do for ourselves if we had to. Here are some to the suggestions that were made by participants:

  1. Inform and educate people about why they should learn the food growing and preservation skills of their ancestors;
  2. Teach them where and how to do it;
  3. Use private garden spaces effectively for this, planning around sun, soil and drainage conditions that are available;
  4. Teach soil enrichment and treatment of different soil textures;
  5. Teach water management;
  6. Advocate for public use of boulevards for food growing;
  7. Identify opportunities for cooperative community (allotment) gardening, close to where people live;
  8. Assist local food merchants identify secure sources of locally grown food to market;
  9. Even with all of this, we lack sufficient local farmland to feed our population, so new and innovative approaches to food growing must be found; and
  10. Increased political action appears necessary to halt all further alienation of potential food growing land.
In Cadboro Bay, there are few sites suitable of growing large quantities of food, apart from on private lots. None of the larger sites are earmarked for this purpose and most are institutionally owned and firmly fixed in people's minds as designated for other purposes. Collectively they could cover only a tiny fraction of our needs. Some of those sites are: UVic was not considered because plans are developing for it to become partly self-sufficient for its on-campus food needs, from its own lands.

There are social barriers to food self sufficiency that include:

What do you want to do about all this folks?


Community Strategies to Lower Carbon Emissions

Summary of Walk & Talk held on February 6, 2011

Notes compiled by Norman Mogensen

As Dr. Francis Zwiers informed this community at a public meeting here on January 20, 2011, climate scientists do have irrefutable evidence that human activities are a factor of major importance in increasing greenhouse gasses in the atmosphere. Those gasses accumulate and are reaching dangerously high levels that are now and will continue for centuries to change our climate and the nature of our weather events. Even if we halt further greenhouse gas increases and begin to lower them now, irrevocable climate changes are underway whose outcomes are unpredictable and highly dangerous to the biosphere of Earth, of which humans are a part. Continued increases of gas accumulations will worsen the situation and diminish human prospects. It is probable that our species has never experienced the climate conditions we have helped set in motion. Past climate changes, probably of lesser magnitudes (the beginnings and endings of past ice ages) have had major influence on reordering living things. Homo sapiens as a separate species are only 200,000 years old (8 to 10,000 generations) and are untested for the conditions that are now developing.

As there are as yet no community level action plans to realize the greenhouse gas reduction targets set out in Saanich's 2010 Climate Action Strategy (some details below), it is important while visioning and planning the future of this community, especially in the near term, that we plan for greenhouse gas reduction targets and expect additional ones to come. It may be helpful to better understand human nature and human cultures as they are expressed through our destructive possessions and activities that contribute greatly to our greenhouse gas emissions. In this respect, Geoffrey F. Miller's book "The Mating Mind" (complementary to Darwin's work) provides insights into how private automobiles and big energy consuming homes may be felt to enhance social status and in so doing subliminally signal genetic fitness. Our cultures need to change by adopting less harmful and non-tyrannical substitutes as it appears the need for fitness status signals will always be important to us.

We surveyed a small part of our community and the following ideas emerged.

We need to repeat this with more participants from our community because this needs wider community input and support. Please don't just leave this to the people who turned out for the February 6th walk and talk. When we meet again, we will invite each of you to bring your ideas about how Cadboro Bay can best think globally and act locally to solve our climate change problems and still enjoy good quality lives. Your community needs your involvement in this.

In 2010 Saanich developed its Climate Action Plan that calls for a 33% reduction in greenhouse gasses being generated here, by 2020. That targeted reduction has been allocated as follows:

Many people say they need to drive, so giving up driving would make their current lifestyle impossible. In view of the crisis we all face, until non polluting transportation systems arrive, perhaps a move closer to where certain individuals must regularly be, is a feasible alternative. Many people say they've got too much to do every day than can be accomplished without use of an automobile. Some people who have been able to simplify their lives by doing less but well, report a definite improvement in the quality of their lives. Those may not be appealing changes but we must always keep in mind the probable results of doing little or nothing about our emissions and profligate use of energy.


About New Walking Route Options

Summary of Walk & Talk held on February 27, 2011

Notes compiled by Norman Mogensen

We walked on a chilly day with some snow and ice still on some of the routes we had chosen, making them somewhat hazardous. We assumed those conditions accounted for the small turn-out. That is of concern because the issues we address are important for the whole community and while small numbers of people can generate a lot of very good ideas, we need a wider array of experience and opinion to help ensure we arrive at properly balanced results with the possibility of wide public acceptance.

On November 21, 2010 we conducted a similar search for new walking routes on the west side of our community (whose results are repeated below, to place the most recent results in context) and on February 27 we examined some similar options on Ten Mile Point. Items 6 to 9 represent those results.

November 21st:

  1. There was once a lost opportunity for a recreational circuit route, when site planning took place respecting the zone between the southwest end of Waring Place and Hibbens Close. This might have made a great return trip path alternative after walking to the south end of the beach. Maybe sometime in the distant future.
  2. A connector to the Village could be considered, from the Maynard Park area and points north and west of there. It could extend between Penrhyn (at the village) and Kilgary, where there is now no existing right of way from the east end of Maynard Park.
  3. Now the public uses the walking lane connecting Hobbs Street to Frank Hobbs School, and then crosses the open school yard, directly to Haro Road. Consider the possibility of a more child secure enclosed perimeter walking lane for the public, along the east boundary of the school yard. It could proceed south from the existing Hobbs Lane, to the southeast corner of the school yard, then west along the south boundary of the school yard, to Haro Road. From there walkers could either go directly up Haro Road to UVic or approach it along Camelot. Both options offer shorter lengths of steepness and are pleasanter alternatives to Sinclair Hill.
  4. A second enclosed and more child secure walking lane could proceed north from Hobbs Lane, along the east boundary of Frank Hobbs School yard, to and through its boundary fence with Goward House lands, where it could split. One option there would be to walk directly to Haro Road between the school and kindergarten enclosures, and from there access the Haro Woods trail network. A second option could be to connect to those parts of the Goward Estate trail network, permitted by the society that manages that property for Saanich. It could also connect with Haro Road and from there, a different part of the Haro Woods trail network.
  5. The Goward trail network can easily connect to any trail network ultimately permitted by UVic on the Queenswood estate. An existing trail in Queenswood extends out onto Queenswood Road, at a point aligned with an existing trail connecting it to Annabern Cres. and MacDonald. The existing trail in Queenswood extends near and could easily link to Haro Road, north of Arbutus and to the Arbutus Road access points to Goward lands, to its south.

    February 27, 2011:

  6. An undeveloped (but passable to pedestrians) public road right of way connects Green Vale Place to McColl Place, which now connects, via greenways, to both Arbutus and Benson. A simple trail (Green Vale to McColl) would improve connections between much of central Ten Mile Point and Telegraph Bay Road.
  7. The westerly part of Phyllis Park consists of a long and narrow strip of land lying north of the Wedgewood complex, that extends to Arbutus Road within 80 meters of Telegraph Bay Road. Parts if that strip are dangerously steep, but it appears possible to build a safe trail that would ultimately connect Konukson Park and eastern Ten Mile Point, via Phyllis Park, to Telegraph Bay Road.
  8. At the eastern tip of Lockehaven Drive, immediately east of 5085 Lockehaven is a narrow access into Phyllis Park. Its boundaries are not well defined so users must be well aware of its limits and exercise caution to remain within the park. This can be an important access point into Phyllis Park, both before and after the improvements suggested under item #7 are undertaken.
  9. Recently discussions took place between residents on Tudor Avenue and Saanich Engineering, which may open the door to an eventual walking trail along and inset from Tudor. On February 27, our time was too short to permit a planned on-the-ground inspection to discover a most appropriate route and to consider solutions to any physical obstacles that might be encountered. This can be the subject of another walk, as can any more ideas that community members might suggest about new walking routes in our community.
Our next community walkabout is scheduled for March 13th (gathering in the Gyro parking lot no later than 1:30 PM). It will focus on the question of what kind of village centre we should aspire to over the coming years. Is it perfect now? If not, what would it take to make it so? After a walkabout appraisal and if the sun shines, we may re-gather on beach logs to sift and sort our ideas. We trust that spring is fast approaching.


Whither Cadboro Bay's Village Centre

Summary of Walk & Talk held on March 13, 2011

Notes compiled by Norman Mogensen

The term "village centre" refers just to that area defined in the 2002 Local Area Plan's Map #10.1, with necessary new adjustments to its boundaries to avoid placing Village enhancements in that part of it that is subject to tsunamis and earthquake amplification and liquefaction, and to give it sufficient size to be a viable village. The subjects discussed here do not pertain to other parts of the Cadboro Bay area.

The subject under consideration was "how should Cadboro Bay Village respond to the pressures of change anticipated during the 21st century". Some of those pressures include:

Here are some of the ideas that emerged.
  1. All participants agreed with Saanich's Official Community Plan policies stated in Section 4-17 of that plan.
  2. All participants agreed that too much of the low lying territory of the village centre, as depicted on map 10.1 of our 2002 Local Area Plan is dangerously and thus wrongly placed for higher density development, due to earthquake and tsunami hazards. Thus, much of the current village centre must be "grandfathered" while new developments should be situated farther uphill, subject to the sub-strata there being able to safely support the structures to be placed upon it.
  3. There is no undeveloped land on sufficiently high ground in the village centre zone, so this envisages only the replacement of some existing structures with new ones, in that zone.
  4. The concept of increasing population density in the village core, if done in a manner that improves the quality of private and community life was encouraged.
  5. Building heights should be limited to 3 or 4 stories (for comfortable access/egress for all ages, during power cuts) and the quality of buildings should be high.
  6. Individual buildings and clusters of buildings should appeal to high art, architectural and sociological standards.
  7. This should be a fully walkable community where, with a higher level of excellence of Transit services, cars should not be necessary to link to this Village and the rest of the region.
  8. Walking routes should provide for essential physical exercise, restoration of mental ease, interesting adventures and social experiences, and be suitable for all ages. The Village should be a hub for a wider network of community walking routes.
  9. Buildings should be highly energy efficient, with ample and intricate exterior mini-parks, terraces, semi-private spaces and interesting walkways that can connect all its parts in interesting ways.
  10. The Village must be such a charming and compellingly enchanting place to live that most of its inhabitants will prefer it to life in isolated single family houses. We must identify and incorporate those elements that make the world's most pleasing communities so attractive.
  11. A multi purpose community centre should form part of it because humans are social animals for whom, in most cases, healthy community provides ultimate satisfaction.
  12. More small scale commercial services should become available to make this a full satisfaction and always charming destination. Accordingly, some structures may have lower level services with residential accommodation above.
  13. The Village should be capable of housing those who work here.
  14. The Village should be so right for the times and so innovative that other communities will want to emulate it.
  15. The village should become one that Jane Jacobs would admire.
Participants urged that a large scale and professionally facilitated community meeting be held soon to engage all of our residents in considering and enhancing these ideas. Participants should include local small business owners and local politicians.


Icons of Cadboro Bay

Summary of Walk & Talk held on March 27, 2011

Notes compiled by Norman Mogensen

All great civilizations of the past have created iconic art and architecture, or preserved and appreciated treasured objects symbolizing what they believed was unique to them. Modern civilizations still strive to do the same thing, but our economic-techno cultures may not be quite so conducive to organic creativity and the appreciation of some of its outcomes. What is going to be our community's contribution to the world treasury of icons, which may bemuse future archaeologists and please connoisseurs? On March 27th some of us set out to take stock of what significant icons we have or could have at Cadboro Bay. Here is what we have so far identified, top of the league or not.

  1. Gyro Park's concrete bestiary; rich in childhood memories for many.
  2. Commemorating Sungayka; the long established aboriginal village on our Bay at the time of first European contact
  3. Commemorating the large Cadboro Bay Hotel (burned in 1931);
  4. A large fountain in the bay. A rejected idea. Too proudly technological and intrusive.
  5. Pharmacy, south wall mural. Uncertain of its acceptance as a widely appreciated symbol of the community, but a maybe.
  6. A vehicle free central village square: Potentially popular, but a maybe, sometime in the future.
  7. Cadboro Bay's original community centre: The (now) house on the southwest corner of Sinclair and Cadboro Bay Road. Is this a proper icon?
  8. The "fat tree" or pioneer child, "Emily Barns' tree", a Bigleaf maple (Acer macrophyllum), located at the west (Hobbs Street) end of Maynard Park.
  9. The "Determination Tree" at west end turn-around on Maynard Street, another a Bigleaf maple (Acer macrophyllum).
  10. A new non-parochial, mind expanding sculpture garden somewhere in the village - a maybe.
  11. Commemoration of remnants of arrival of Vancouver Island's first telegraph service and Giant Powder Works (later CIL), both at Telegraph Bay - not warmly received ideas, due to their early associations with wars.
  12. Sinclair Hill water tower - could become a place of interior or exterior display of interchangeable archival pictures of early Cadboro Bay. Also, could be stage one of an upgraded walkway/stairway with view-point, resting place landings for slow pilgrimages down to the Village.
  13. St. Georges tree, a giant maple located 25 meters north of the intersection of St. Georges Lane and Maynard.
  14. Can you think of others?

A More Vibrant Community

Summary of Walk & Talk held on April 10, 2011

Notes compiled by Norman Mogensen

Some may think Cadboro Bay vibrates enough already, but others think there is definitely room for improvement.

What is a community in this context?

The purpose of this gathering was to consider how to strengthen our 'fellowship of interests', so that we tend to continue to interact in a more unified and effective way.

When humans did this best may have been in the prolonged formative stage of our cultures, as hunter/gatherers, when many of our human character traits became hard wired in our brains.

What did we do then that worked?

  1. We tried to co-exist in secure harmony, with sufficiency.
  2. We discussed our common problems to seek resolution.
  3. We evolved rules for living together.
  4. We cooperated.
  5. We worked hard together.
  6. We socialized.
  7. We played together.
  8. We cared for each other.
  9. The natural biosphere ultimately ruled us and was, in turn, ruled by celestial physics - but we have in large measure, forgotten about much of that.
How can we make ours a more healthy community?

Come together and talk things over, often.
Learn to govern ourselves well with sufficient personal freedom, subject to being in harmony with group and planetary biospheric cohesion.
Think deeply and learn together.
Play together often.
Work to reduce anti-social behaviors, like xenophobia, caste, cruelty, elements of psychopathy, etc.

Concrete Ideas:

  1. Structure the village to better accommodate group assembly.
  2. Now, age demographics divide our society to an unhealthy degree, separating us into age group cohort/silos with inaccurate perceptions of cohorts other than our own.
  3. That works against united group cohesion and common action, and it militates against social integrity and indeed, civilization continuity.
  4. Strive to erase demographic divisions in our community. Let's have an expert led community discussion on the matter, to find our way forward to sunlit civic and civil unity.
  5. Strive to end intergenerational alienation, particularly that of the young who will inherit the mistakes of their elders and have to cope with their results.
  6. Look hard at 'Attachment Theory' and as a possible guide to how we may need to adapt our ways, to succeed more often.
  7. Some think today's youth tend to be very conservative (note, small 'c'). Why? Boldness has most often been the hallmark of youth, throughout history.
  8. Our elders are losing effective connection with the young (not new), through not keeping abreast with the communications technologies (new) and the related mores so many of the young have adapted to.
  9. In this community, many youths and even their parent's generation, feel that 'old people' and the institutions they dominate, control everything. They feel unheard, under-valued and alienated from participating in the community of the old.
  10. Maybe Facebook could be a vehicle through which we can again connect with each other.
  11. Start a CBRA youth committee, using social media, to reach out more effectively to all elements of our community.
  12. Find more enjoyable ways for all of the community to join in basic participatory play, together (dances, all forms of music, poetry, story telling, and all forms of participatory art and thespian creativity that can be a joy to watch and listen to, as has been known to and enjoyed by our ancestors for many thousands of years).
  13. In that context, press forward with a good quality (more than token) amphitheatre in Gyro Park.
  14. For these purposes and to commemorate First Nations people, who occupied this land before the arrival of Europeans, consider (with their full participation) creating a traditional native big-house as the eventual Gyro Park Community House.
  15. To increase resident involvement in community affairs, develop a series of single subject projects, each of concern to a significant number of residents, even if those people are widely distributed across the area. Tackle one at a time and as each is about to be concluded, introduce the next. Try to involve all age cohorts. Make each project stimulating and with a strong element of fun. Participants can be encouraged to bring their own coffee and treats. Projects can include anything that enough people believe to be important to us. Starting with a single task and resolving it well can build confidence in what else we can accomplish together.
  16. Continue to organize 'town hall' meetings with expert speakers, on substantial issues affecting the community. After any lecture try to gather people to discuss the subject further; perhaps over self supplied coffee and snacks.
  17. When appropriate, organize charettes to gather community opinion and ideas about important local issues.
  18. Through CBRA's mandate, work with and support community activists who will undertake to seek resolution of local problems like traffic safety on Tudor Avenue, and use their help to carry those to effective conclusions.
  19. Keep Sunday afternoon 'Walk and Talks' going for a long time to come, as a forum for considering specific topical and general community issues.
  20. Alternate them with Sunday afternoon coffee talks about similar subjects, at one of our community coffee houses. Post the results of all of these on the CBRA website.
  21. Volunteers for CBRA's 21st Century Vision and Planning Committee should be approached to undertake the continuation of items 19 and 20, as Norman Mogensen must soon move away from the community.

Community ideas, compiled by Norman Mogensen


Our Natural Areas at Risk

Summary of Walk & Talk held on May 1, 2011

Notes compiled by Norman Mogensen

Objectives:

  1. Identify and inspect some of our community's publicly owned natural areas (see page 70 of the 2002 Cadboro Bay Local Area Plan, map 11.1 for site references and note that Policy 11.6 of the Plan still has not been carried out by Saanich - with our participation).
  2. Examine why each area is at risk

During the 7 generations since Europeans first settled on southern Vancouver Island, their exponential population growth and impacts on the land have reduced the natural landscape to only a very tiny fragment of what we originally found here. The small remnant of that which Cadboro Bay is fortunate to contain is still under great pressure from those who think our population and economic growth can be perpetual, and who typically say we must be prepared to compromise our natural areas further for it. During this walk, the following sites were examined and discussed from the foregoing perspective.

With respect to all of these closely associated forest remnants, we must earnestly ask ourselves:

SHALL WE BEGIN TO LIVE ON EARTH AS THOUGH WE PLAN A LONG STAY?

And then:

IS IT TIME TO ADOPT A NEW ETHIC ABOUT LAND AND BIOSPHERE CUSTODIANSHIP? PLEASE THINK ABOUT THIS.

In pursuit of this, it is recommended that the next event in this series be a coffee meeting to discuss all of your ideas on this topic. A new organizer for that needs to be found because Norm Mogensen must re-locate, probably to another community with more appropriate amenities for independently aging in place.